Travel Grant: Anouk Post (Boston)

I am a PhD student at the Academic Medical Center, where I perform research on imaging techniques to diagnose prostate cancer. A travel grant from the Netherlands' Society for Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering enabled me to visit the Wellman Center for Photomedicine in Boston (part of Harvard and Massachusetts’s General Hospital) for three months.

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Travel Grant: S. De Keijzer (Chigaco)

I’m a post-doc in the Department of Tumor Immunology at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. I study the dynamics of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) with single-particle tracking microscopy, which I believe is a key approach to directly monitor the function of a protein or protein complex within its natural environment.

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Travel Grant: Petra van Houdt (Montreal)

The main topic of our project is the optimization and evaluation of co-registered EEG and functional MRI in patients who are candidates for epilepsy surgery. This project is a collaboration between Kempenhaeghe (dr. Pauly Ossenblok and Prof. dr. Paul Boon), VU medical center (dr. Jan de Munck and Prof. Dr. Kees Stam) and UMC Utrecht (dr. Frans Leijten). EEG-fMRI is a relatively new technique, which has been used as a research tool, but our results and the results of other groups indicate that EEG-fMRI is well suitable as a clinical tool

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Travel Grant: Koen van den Dries (Albuquerque)

From the 30th of August to the 13th of September 2011 I have visited the lab of Keith Lidke at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque to perform direct STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (dSTORM) to gain more insight into the ultrastructure of podosomes.

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Travel Grant: Namik Akkilic (Italy)

Gordon Research Conference: Single Molecule Approaches to Biology, June 27-July 2, 2010 Italy

I am 3rd year PhD student at Leiden University in the group of Thijs J. Aartsma. In my research, we focus on development an ultrasensitive biosensor by exploiting the FluRedox principle. Unlike typical electrochemical sensors, FluRedox biosensors are based on a novel concept, monitoring the redox events in vitro and in vivo by fluorescence detection using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), with potential for detection of electron turnover at the single-molecule level. Therefore, we apply this detection method to the redox state of proteins, combining FRET-based fluorescence/confocal microscopy on dye-labeled protein with cyclic voltammetry. By using these combined techniques, electron transfer processes can be monitored from protein to electrode or from redox enzyme to substrate. In a later stage, the method will be applied to enzymes of interest for biosensor development.

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